Monday, December 8, 2014

Rilla of Ingleside: Abridged vs. Unabridged

I finished reading Rilla of Ingleside by L.M. Montgomery this week. It's the last book in the Anne of Green Gable series, and I loved it. I think it's one of the very best in the whole series.

When I went to go rate it on Goodreads, I noticed someone's comment that "It was recently drawn to my attention by a fellow Goodreads reader that the editions of Rilla of Ingleside, for which we had become accustomed, are abridged versions of the original edition that L.M. Montgomery published. Somehow along the way, an abridged edition appeared through an American publishing house and that abridged version became the standard (accidentally)." 

I was like, "Whaaaaaat?" and investigated further. And it turns out this is true! The book I borrowed from the library, a Bantam Book published by HarperCollins Publishers in 1992, and which claims that "This edition contains the complete text of the original hardcover edition; Not one word has been omitted," is abridged. 
One of the abridged versions

A new, "restored" version of Rilla of Ingleside was published by Viking Canada in 2010, and the editors explained in this interview how the abridged version of Rilla came to be the standard book on the shelves, masquerading as the unabridged original: 

"This new edition of Rilla of Ingleside includes the tag “A new, unabridged and fully restored edition” on the cover. What does this mean?
In the 1970s, a reprint edition of Rilla of Ingleside silently cut 4,500 words, or 4% of the original text (to put it another way, that’s fourteen pages of text that are missing). That edition was reprinted by Bantam-Seal in the 1980s and remains in print today. This new edition restores the full text of the original edition, published in 1921.

What types of material were cut?
There doesn’t seem to be a clear pattern of deletions: some pertain simply to adverbs that are no longer in general use (verily, ignominiously), whereas others involve entire scenes that have been excised. Most of the cuts occur in the first half of the book, which indicates that the abridgment was done primarily for length. Most of the cuts seem fairly arbitrary."

This other page explains the same thing: "A later reprint of Rilla of Ingleside silently abridged the text by 4,500 words, and it is this text that has been available to North American readers since the 1980s. A restored, unabridged, and annotated edition, edited by Benjamin Lefebvre and Andrea McKenzie, was published by Viking Canada in October 2010. It contains the full text of Virna Sheard’s poem “The Young Knights,” which Montgomery excerpted as her epigraph."

The new, unabridged version

So, I went looking for the differences in the abridged vs. original text. I wanted to read the 4,500 words that I had missed when reading the abridged version. But I couldn't find a single comparison online! It appears that one person did do a comparison a couple years ago, but the link is now broken and the webpage doesn't exist anymore.

Soooo, I went through and compared the abridged Bantam Book copy of Rilla of Ingleside I have with the free, unabridged Project Gutenberg copy of Rilla of Ingleside. I didn't find all the words that were cut, but I did find about 3,600 of them. Definitely all the big passages, and a whole bunch of the little ones. *If anyone reading this has found more of the differences, please feel free to post them in a comment!* I've compiled them below, for anyone that mind find them useful!


Rilla of Ingleside: Abridged vs Unabridged Text

Bantam Page Number Abridged Text Original Text
4 "...chasing him out of her domain..." "...chasing him ignominiously out of her domain..."
5 "He would do anything for Jem, I believe." "He would do anything for Jem, I verily believe."
12 She was not pretty but there was a certain charm of interest and mystery in her face. She was not pretty but there was a certain charm of interest and mystery in her face, and Rilla found her fascinating.
12 At all other times she was a stimulating companion. At all other times she was a stimulating companion, and the gay set at Ingleside never remembered that she was so much older than themselves.
13 She knew that Rilla longed to be "out"—to go to parties as Nan and Di did, and to have dainty evening dresses and—beaux! She knew that Rilla longed to be "out"—to go to parties as Nan and Di did, and to have dainty evening dresses and—yes, there is no mincing matters—beaux!
13 Walter was, as ever, the handsomest of the Ingleside boys. Walter was, as ever, the handsomest of the Ingleside boys. Miss Oliver found pleasure in looking at him for his good looks—he was so exactly like what she would have liked her own son to be.
13 That sonnet sequence was really a remarkable thing for a lad of twenty to write. That sonnet sequence was really a remarkable thing for a lad of twenty to write. Miss Oliver was no partial critic and she knew that Walter Blythe had a wonderful gift.
15 Everybody at Ingleside was fond of him, even Susan. Everybody at Ingleside was fond of him, even Susan, although his one unfortunate propensity of sneaking into the spare room and going to sleep on the bed tried her affection sorely.
23 A little girl indeed! She whisked out of the kitchen in high dudgeon. Her spirits rose again when she found herself one of the gay crowd bound for the Four Winds light. A little girl indeed! She whisked out of the kitchen in high dudgeon. Another time she wouldn't go down to show herself off to Susan—Susan, who thought nobody was grown up until she was sixty! And that horrid Cousin Sophia with her digs about freckles and legs! What business had an old—an old beanpole like that to talk of anybody else being long and thin? Rilla felt all her pleasure in herself and her evening clouded and spoiled. The very teeth of her soul were set on edge and she could have sat down and cried.

But later on her spirits rose again when she found herself one of the gay crowd bound for the Four Winds light.
25 The gulf beyond was still silvery blue in the afterlight. Rilla loved life. She was going to have a splendid time. The gulf beyond was still silvery blue in the afterlight. Oh, it was all glorious—the clear air with its salt tang, the balsam of the firs, the laughter of her friends. Rilla loved life—its bloom and brilliance; she loved the ripple of music, the hum of merry conversation; she wanted to walk on forever over this road of silver and shadow. It was her first party and she was going to have a splendid time.
32 Rilla looked about her and thought how lovely her first party had been. She would never forget it. Rilla looked about her and thought how lovely her first party had been. She would never forget it. The room re-echoed to laughter and jest. Beautiful young eyes sparkled and shone. From the pavilion outside came the lilt of the fiddle and the rhythmic steps of the dancers.
32 Why didn't Jack Elliott speak—if he had anything to tell? Why didn't Jack Elliott speak—if he had anything to tell? Why did he just stand there, glowering importantly?
34 Walter Blythe was always saying odd things. Walter Blythe was always saying odd things. That old Piper of his—she hadn't heard anything about him since their playdays in Rainbow Valley—and now here he was bobbing up again. She didn't like it, and that was the long and short of it.
35 It does not do to laugh at the pangs of youth. They are very terrible because youth has not yet learned that "this, too, will pass away." It does not do to laugh at the pangs of youth. They are very terrible because youth has not yet learned that "this, too, will pass away." Rilla sighed and wished she were home, in bed, crying into her pillow.
36 Why, for mercy's sake, did boys try to dance who didn't know the first thing about dancing; and who had feet as big as boats? Why, for mercy's sake, did boys try to dance who didn't know the first thing about dancing; and who had feet as big as boats? There, he had bumped her into somebody! She would never dance with him again!
41 Susan sat as if paralysed, her piece of pie half-eaten on her plate. Susan sat as if paralysed, her piece of pie half-eaten on her plate. Susan never did finish that piece of pie—a fact which bore eloquent testimony to the upheaval in her inner woman for Susan considered it a cardinal offence against civilized society to begin to eat anything and not finish it. That was wilful waste, hens to the contrary notwithstanding.
43 "Your father says it will be over in a few months and I have as much faith in his opinion as I have in Lord Anybody's." "Your father says it will be over in a few months and I have as much faith in his opinion as I have in Lord Anybody's. So just let us be calm and trust in the Almighty and get this place tidied up. I am done with crying which is a waste of time and discourages everybody."
49 "Amen to that," nodded Mrs. Norman. "Bat-blind as most of them were somebody had foresight enough to see to that." "Amen to that," nodded Mrs. Norman. "Bat-blind as most of them were somebody had foresight enough to see to that."

 "Maybe England'll manage not to get into trouble over it," said Cousin Sophia plaintively. "I dunno. But I'm much afraid."

"One would suppose that England was in trouble over it already, up to her neck, Sophia Crawford," said Susan. "But your ways of thinking are beyond me and always were. It is my opinion that the British Navy will settle Germany in a jiffy and that we are all getting worked up over nothing."

Susan spat out the words as if she wanted to convince herself more than anybody else. She had her little store of homely philosophies to guide her through life, but she had nothing to buckler her against the thunderbolts of the week that had just passed. What had an honest, hard-working, Presbyterian old maid of Glen St. Mary to do with a war thousands of miles away? Susan felt that it was indecent that she should have to be disturbed by it.
50 "Don't you tell me one Britisher isn't a match for ten foreigners." "Don't you tell me one Britisher isn't a match for ten foreigners. I could polish off a dozen of 'em myself with both hands tied behind my back!"
50 "They've a kind of presentiment that it wouldn't be healthy for their complaint." "Lord love you, they've a kind of presentiment, so to speak, that it wouldn't be healthy for their complaint."
54 "Even the old cat at the manse has passed away." "Even the old cat at the manse has passed away. He breathed his last at a quarter to ten last night and Bruce is quite heart-broken, they tell me. It's time that pussy went where good cats go. He must be at least fifteen years old. He has seemed so lonely since Aunt Martha died."
54 "Ellen West used to be always railing at the Kaiser and we thought her crazy, but now I see that there was a method in her madness." "Ellen West used to be always railing at the Kaiser and we thought her crazy, but now I see that there was a method in her madness. This tray is packed, Mrs. Dr. dear, and I will go down and put in my best licks preparing supper. I wish I knew when I would cook another supper for Jem but such things are hidden from our eyes."
55 "The beast has more sense than most humans," said Mary Vance. "The beast has more sense than most humans," said Mary Vance. "Well, did we any of us ever think we'd live to see this day? I bawled all night to think of Jem and Jerry going like this. I think they're plumb deranged."
56 "Let them European nations fight it out between them," said Abner Reese. "Let them European nations fight it out between them," said Abner Reese.

 "When he was a boy I gave him many a good trouncing," shouted Norman Douglas, who seemed to be referring to some one high in military circles in Charlottetown. "Yes, sir, I walloped him well, big gun as he is now."
57 Rilla felt as if she were in some fantastic nightmare. Rilla felt as if she were in some fantastic nightmare. Were these the people who, three weeks ago, were talking of crops and prices and local gossip?
57 Nothing to do now but to go home—and wait. Nothing to do now but to go home—and wait. The doctor and Mrs. Blythe walked off together—so did Nan and Faith—so did John Meredith and Rosemary. Walter and Una and Shirley and Di and Carl and Rilla went in a group. Susan had put her bonnet back on her head, hindside foremost, and stalked grimly off alone.
61 Her first impulse was to turn and flee. But that would not do. Rilla's first impulse was to turn and flee. But that would never do.
61 "You're the doctor's miss, ain't ye?" "You're the doctor's miss, ain't ye? Have a cheer?"

 Rilla did not see any chair which was not cluttered with something. She remained standing.
62 Yet a feeling of pity for the desolate, orphaned mite took sudden possession of her. Yet a feeling of pity for the desolate, orphaned mite which had "come out of the everywhere" into such a dubious "here", took sudden possession of her.
62 "I ain't a-going to trouble myself with it, I can tell yez. I told Min it'd have to be sent to an orphan asylum till we'd see if Jim ever came back to look after it. She didn't relish the idee." "I ain't a-going to trouble myself with it, I can tell yez. I brung up a boy that my sister left and he skinned out as soon as he got to be some good and won't give me a mite o' help in my old age, ungrateful whelp as he is. I told Min it'd have to be sent to an orphan asylum till we'd see if Jim ever came back to look after it. Would yez believe it, she didn't relish the idee."
62 "I hadn't time—took me all the time there was looking after Min." "I hadn't time—took me all the time there was looking after Min. 'Sides, as I told yez, I don't know nithing about kids."
63 "Sure, if yez wants to," said Mrs. Conover amiably. "Sure, if yez wants to," said Mrs. Conover amiably. "I hain't any objection. Take it and welcome."
64 "Better not let the wind blow on it," admonished Mrs. Conover. "Take its breath if it do." "Better not let the wind blow on it," admonished Mrs. Conover. "Take its breath if it do."

Rilla wrapped the tattered little quilt around the soup tureen.

"Will you hand this to me after I get into the buggy, please?"

"Sure I will," said Mrs. Conover, getting up with a grunt.
71 "...lies down patiently to wait for the next train. One day some boys threw stones at Monday and old Johnny Mead, who never was known to take notice of anything before, snatched up a meat axe in the butcher's shop and chased them through the village." "...lies down patiently to wait for the next train. Mr. Gray, the station master, says there are times when he can hardly help crying from sheer sympathy. One day some boys threw stones at Monday and old Johnny Mead, who never was known to take notice of anything before, snatched up a meat axe in the butcher's shop and chased them through the village. Nobody has molested Monday since."
76 "Business as usual is England's motto, they tell me, Mrs. Dr. dear, and I have taken it for mine." "Business as usual is England's motto, they tell me, Mrs. Dr. dear, and I have taken it for mine, not thinking I could easily find a better. I shall make the same kind of pudding today I always make on Saturday. It is a good deal of trouble to make, and that is well, for it will employ my thoughts."
76 "A sock a day is my allowance." "A sock a day is my allowance. Old Mrs. Albert Mead of Harbour Head manages a pair and a half a day but she has nothing to do but knit. You know, Mrs. Dr. dear, she has been bed-rid for years and she has been worrying terrible because she was no good to anybody and a dreadful expense, and yet could not die and be out of the way. And now they tell me she is quite chirked up and resigned to living because there is something she can do, and she knits for the soldiers from daylight to dark."
76 "And they say Joe Milgrave would too, only he is afraid that if he does that Whiskers-on-the-moon will not let him have Miranda." "And they say Joe Milgrave would too, only he is afraid that if he does that Whiskers-on-the-moon will not let him have Miranda. Whiskers says that he will believe the stories of German atrocities when he sees them, and that it is a good thing that Rangs Cathedral has been destroyed because it was a Roman Catholic church. Now, I am not a Roman Catholic, Mrs. Dr. dear, being born and bred a good Presbyterian and meaning to live and die one, but I maintain that the Catholics have as good a right to their churches as we have to ours and that the Huns had no kind of business to destroy them. Just think, Mrs. Dr. dear," concluded Susan pathetically, "how we would feel if a German shell knocked down the spire of our church here in the glen, and I'm sure it is every bit as bad to think of Rangs cathedral being hammered to pieces."

And, meanwhile, everywhere, the lads of the world rich and poor, low and high, white and brown, were following the Piper's call.
76 "I don't believe I could bear another parting from him." "I don't believe I could bear another parting from him—now that I know the war will not be over as soon as we hoped when he left first."
78 "I have always said that the devil was in him and that I will tie to."

Susan opened the door and looked in.
"I have always said that the devil was in him and that I will tie to."

"It is my opinion that the cat has hydrophobia," said Cousin Sophia solemnly. "I once heard of a cat that went mad and bit three people—and they all died a most terrible death, and turned black as ink."

Undismayed by this, Susan opened the door and looked in.
79 Anything like Doc's shrieks while the process was going on was never heard at Ingleside. Anything like Doc's shrieks while the process was going on was never heard at Ingleside. Susan was in mortal dread that the Albert Crawfords would hear it and conclude she was torturing the creature to death.
79 "The Huns themselves couldn't have worked more havoc here," she said bitterly. "The Huns themselves couldn't have worked more havoc here," she said bitterly. "But when people will keep a Satanic animal like that, in spite of all warnings, they cannot complain when their wedding bowls get broken."
80 "I must take up my knitting then and knit hard till the papers come, Mrs. Dr. dear." "I must take up my knitting then and knit hard till the papers come, Mrs. Dr. dear. Knitting is something you can do, even when your heart is going like a trip-hammer and the pit of your stomach feels all gone and your thoughts are catawampus."
80 "...the Kaiser will not eat his Christmas dinner in London this year." "...the Kaiser will not eat his Christmas dinner in London this year. Do you know, Mrs. Dr. dear,"—Susan's voice lowered as a token that she was going to impart a very shocking piece of information,—"I have been told on good authority—or else you may be sure I would not be repeating it when it concerns a minster—that the Rev. Mr. Arnold goes to Charlottetown every week and takes a Turkish bath for his rheumatism. The idea of him doing that when we are at war with Turkey? One of his own deacons has always insisted that Mr. Arnold's theology was not sound and I am beginning to believe that there is some reason to fear it."
83 "When I wake up in the night and cannot go to sleep again," remarked Susan, who was knitting and reading at the same time, "I pass the moments by torturing the Kaiser to death. Last night I fried him in boiling oil and a great comfort it was to me, remembering those Belgian babies." "When I wake up in the night and cannot go to sleep again," remarked Susan, who was knitting and reading at the same time, "I pass the moments by torturing the Kaiser to death. Last night I fried him in boiling oil and a great comfort it was to me, remembering those Belgian babies."

"If the Kaiser were here and had a pain in his shoulder you'd be the first to run for the liniment bottle to rub him down," laughed Miss Oliver.

"Would I?" cried outraged Susan. "Would I, Miss Oliver? I would rub him down with coal oil, Miss Oliver—and leave it to blister. That is what I would do and that you may tie to. A pain in his shoulder, indeed! He will have pains all over him before he is through with what he has started."
83 "I dare say the Austrians and Russians would think Saskatchewan and Musquodoboit about as bad, Susan," said Miss Oliver. "I dare say the Austrians and Russians would think Saskatchewan and Musquodoboit about as bad, Susan," said Miss Oliver. "The Serbians have done wonderfully of late. They have captured Belgrade."

"And sent the Austrian creatures packing across the Danube with a flea in their ear," said Susan with a relish, as she settled down to examine a map of Eastern Europe, prodding each locality with the knitting needle to brand it on her memory. "Cousin Sophia said awhile ago that Serbia was done for, but I told her there was still such a thing as an over-ruling Providence, doubt it who might. It says here that the slaughter was terrible. For all they were foreigners it is awful to think of so many men being killed, Mrs. Dr. dear—for they are scarce enough as it is."
84 "When mother saw the hat and the tag she just looked at me. Mother is some expert at looking." "When mother saw the hat and the tag she just looked at me. Mother is some expert at looking. Father says she looked him into love with her years ago in Avonlea school and I can well believe it—though I have heard a weird tale of her banging him over the head with a slate at the very beginning of their acquaintance. Mother was a limb when she was a little girl, I understand, and even up to the time when Jem went away she was full of ginger. But let me return to my mutton—that is to say, my new green velvet hat."
86 "All the girls have always said Irene was jealous-minded and I would never believe them before." "All the girls have always said Irene was jealous-minded and I would never believe them before. But now I feel that perhaps she is."
89 "He is not quite such a nuisance as he was; he has got some backbone and can sit up quite nicely, and he loves his bath now and splashes unsmilingly in the water instead of twisting and shrieking." "He is not quite such a nuisance as he was; he has got some backbone and can sit up quite nicely, and he loves his bath now and splashes unsmilingly in the water instead of twisting and shrieking. Oh, shall I ever forget those first two months! I don't know how I lived through them. But here I am and here is Jims and we both are going to 'carry on.'"
91 "I do not believe—I know. That does not worry me. We must just trust in God and make big guns." "I do not believe—I know. That does not worry me. What does worry me is the trouble and expense of it all. But then you cannot make omelets without breaking eggs, so we must just trust in God and make big guns."
91 "'Big guns are good but the Almighty is better, and He is on our side, no matter what the Kaiser says about it.'" "'Big guns are good but the Almighty is better, and He is on our side, no matter what the Kaiser says about it.' I would have gone crazy many a day lately, Miss Oliver, dear, if I had not sat tight and repeated that to myself."
91 "...I was not flippant, Miss Oliver, dear, only calm and confident in the British navy and our Canadian boys."

"I hate going to bed now," said Mrs. Blythe.
"...I was not flippant, Miss Oliver, dear, only calm and confident in the British navy and our Canadian boys. I am like old Mr. William Pollock of the Harbour Head. He is very old and has been ill for a long time, and one night last week he was so low that his daughter-in-law whispered to some one that she thought he was dead. 'Darn it, I ain't,' he called right out—only, Miss Oliver, dear, he did not use so mild a word as 'darn'—'darn it, I ain't, and I don't mean to die until the Kaiser is well licked.' Now, that, Miss Oliver, dear," concluded Susan, "is the kind of spirit I admire."

"I admire it but I can't emulate it," sighed Gertrude. "Before this, I have always been able to escape from the hard things of life for a little while by going into dreamland, and coming back like a giant refreshed. But I can't escape from this."

"Nor I," said Mrs. Blythe. "I hate going to bed now."
95 "...I cannot console myself with the thought that the tales are not true." "...I cannot console myself with the thought that the tales are not true. When I read a novel that makes me want to weep I just say severely to myself, 'Now, Susan Baker, you know that is all a pack of lies.'"
95 "Now that he has enlisted she wishes she had never said a word to him." "Now that he has enlisted she wishes she had never said a word to him. You know Josiah Cooper and William Daley, Mrs. Dr. dear. They used to be fast friends but they quarrelled twenty years ago and have never spoken since. Well, the other day Josiah went to William and said right out, 'Let us be friends. 'Tain't any time to be holding grudges.' William was real glad and held out his hand, and they sat down for a good talk. And in less than half an hour they had quarrelled again, over how the war ought to be fought, Josiah holding that the Dardanelles expedition was rank folly and William maintaining that it was the one sensible thing the Allies had done. And now they are madder at each other than ever and William says Josiah is as bad a pro-German as Whiskers-on-the-Moon."
103 "I hope he will not let his mother hear him talking like that." "I hope he will not let his mother hear him talking like that," she thought as she stacked the hoes and rake away.
121 "I only know that it seems they do have to go, unless we all want to be Kaiserised." "I only know that it seems they do have to go, unless we all want to be Kaiserised—for I can assure you that the Monroe doctrine, whatever it is, is nothing to tie to, with Woodrow Wilson behind it. The Huns, Dr. dear, will never be brought to book by notes."
136 "...she was well-known to be a heedless creature." "...she was well-known to be a heedless creature. One day she found a nest of five eggs as she was going across the fields to church with a brand new blue silk dress on. So she put them in the pocket of her petticoat and when she got to church she forgot all about them and sat down on them and her dress was ruined, not to speak of the petticoat. Let me see—would not Tod be some relation of yours? Your great grandmother West was a MacAllister. Her brother Amos was a MacDonaldite in religion. I am told he used to take the jerks something fearful. But you look more like your great grandfather West than the MacAllisters. He died of a paralytic stroke quite early in life."
141 "Do not let yourself slump like poor Cousin Sophia." "Do not let yourself slump like poor Cousin Sophia. She said, when the word came, 'Ah, it is nothing but a rift in the clouds. We are up this week but we will be down the next.' 'Well, Sophia Crawford,' said I,—for I will never give in to her, Mrs. Dr. dear—'God himself cannot make two hills without a hollow between them, as I have heard it said, but that is no reason why we should not take the good of the hills when we are on them.' But Cousin Sophia moaned on. 'Here is the Gallipolly expedition a failure and the Grand Duke Nicholas sent off, and everyone knows the Czar of Rooshia is a pro-German and the Allies have no ammunition and Bulgaria is going against us. And the end is not yet, for England and France must be punished for their deadly sins until they repent in sackcloth and ashes.' 'I think myself,' I said, 'that they will do their repenting in khaki and trench mud, and it seems to me that the Huns should have a few sins to repent of also.' 'They are instruments in the hands of the Almighty, to purge the garner,' said Sophia. And then I got mad, Mrs. Dr. dear, and told her I did not and never would believe that the Almighty ever took such dirty instruments in hand for any purpose whatever, and that I did not consider it decent for her to be using the words of Holy Writ as glibly as she was doing in ordinary conversation. She was not, I told her, a minister or even an elder. And for the time being I squelched her, Mrs. Dr. dear. Cousin Sophia has no spirit. She is very different from her niece, Mrs. Dean Crawford over-harbour. You know the Dean Crawfords had five boys and now the new baby is another boy. All the connection and especially Dean Crawford were much disappointed because their hearts had been set on a girl; but Mrs. Dean just laughed and said, 'Everywhere I went this summer I saw the sign "MEN WANTED" staring me in the face. Do you think I could go and have a girl under such circumstances?' There is spirit for you, Mrs. Dr. dear. But Cousin Sophia would say the child was just so much more cannon fodder."
143 "...when they get it into their heads that this war is not a correspondence school." "...when they get it into their heads that this war is not a correspondence school. They will not," said Susan, energetically waving a saucepan with one hand and a soup ladle with the other, "be too proud to fight then."
152 Cousin Sophia was also there, knitting. Cousin Sophia was also there, knitting. All the boys were going to be killed in the long run, so Cousin Sophia felt in her bones, but they might better die with warm feet than cold ones, so Cousin Sophia knitted faithfully and gloomily.
153 "I must be getting old, Gilbert." Mrs. Blythe laughed a trifle ruefully. "People are beginning to tell me I look so young. They never tell you that when you are young. But I shall not worry over my silver thread. I never liked red hair." "I must be getting old, Gilbert." Mrs. Blythe laughed a trifle ruefully. "People are beginning to tell me I look so young. They never tell you that when you are young. But I shall not worry over my silver thread. I never liked red hair. Gilbert, did I ever tell you of that time, years ago at Green Gables, when I dyed my hair? Nobody but Marilla and I knew about it."

"Was that the reason you came out once with your hair shingled to the bone?"

"Yes. I bought a bottle of dye from a German Jew pedlar. I fondly expected it would turn my hair black—and it turned it green. So it had to be cut off."

"You had a narrow escape, Mrs. Dr. dear," exclaimed Susan. "Of course you were too young then to know what a German was. It was a special mercy of Providence that it was only green dye and not poison."

"It seems hundreds of years since those Green Gables days," sighed Mrs. Blythe. "They belonged to another world altogether. Life has been cut in two by the chasm of war. What is ahead I don't know—but it can't be a bit like the past. I wonder if those of us who have lived half our lives in the old world will ever feel wholly at home in the new."
164 There were days when they waited in despair for the end as foot by foot the Germans crept nearer and nearer to the grim barrier of desperate France. There were days when they waited in despair for the end as foot by foot the Germans crept nearer and nearer to the grim barrier of desperate France.

Susan's deeds were in her spotless kitchen at Ingleside, but her thoughts were on the hills around Verdun. "Mrs. Dr. dear," she would stick her head in at Mrs. Blythe's door the last thing at night to remark, "I do hope the French have hung onto the Crow's Wood today," and she woke at dawn to wonder if Dead Man's Hill—surely named by some prophet—was still held by the "poyloos." Susan could have drawn a map of the country around Verdun that would have satisfied a chief of staff.
183 "The Huns have not got all the cleverness in the world." "The Huns have not got all the cleverness in the world. Have you not heard the story of Alistair MacCallum's son Roderick, from the Upper Glen? He is a prisoner in Germany and his mother got a letter from him last week. He wrote that he was being very kindly treated and that all the prisoners had plenty of food and so on, till you would have supposed everything was lovely. But when he signed his name, right in between Roderick and MacCallum, he wrote two Gaelic words that meant 'all lies' and the German censor did not understand Gaelic and thought it was all part of Roddy's name. So he let it pass, never dreaming how he was diddled."
191 "...and Rainbow Valley a haunt of delight with wild asters blowing all over it—our old 'farewell-summers.'" "...and Rainbow Valley a haunt of delight with wild asters blowing all over it—our old 'farewell-summers.' I always liked that name better than 'aster'—it was a poem in itself."
207 "But I will not forget myself again." "But I will not forget myself again. Only if things do not go as smoothly in the kitchen for a few days I hope you will make due allowance for me."
212 The aeroplane soared and dipped and circled, and soared again, until it became a mere speck far over the sunset hills. The aeroplane soared and dipped and circled, and soared again, until it became a mere speck far over the sunset hills.

"'With the majesty of pinion Which the Theban eagles bear Sailing with supreme dominion Through the azure fields of air.'" quoted Anne Blythe dreamily.
213 "...he had a wild desire to get back home to the old planet and the companionship of fellow creatures. "...he had a wild desire to get back home to the old planet and the companionship of fellow creatures. He soon got over that feeling, but he says his first flight alone was a nightmare to him because of that dreadful sensation of ghastly loneliness."
222 "...and such an army cannot be defeated." "'...and such an army cannot be defeated.' No it cannot. We will win in the end. I will not doubt it for one moment. To let myself doubt would be to 'break faith.'"
222 "He may be a pacifist, but he knows a good investment when it is handed out to him." "He may be a pacifist, but he knows a good investment when it is handed out to him. Five and a half per cent is five and a half per cent, even when a militaristic government pays it."
238 "...and gone down to defeat in spite of it." "...and gone down to defeat in spite of it. Ours is 'but one more To baffled millions who have gone before.'"
238 Susan was already planning a new line of defence for the channel ports. Susan was already planning a new line of defence for the channel ports.

"As long as we can hold them," she declared, "the situation is saved. Paris has really no military significance."

"Don't," said Gertrude sharply, as if Susan had run something into her. She thought the old worn phrase 'no military significance' nothing short of ghastly mockery under the circumstances, and more terrible to endure than the voice of despair would have been.
238 "Depend upon it, girls, that part of the message can't be true."

This point of view cheered them all a little, and helped them through the evening.
"Depend upon it, girls, that part of the message can't be true. I'm going to try to try a long-distance call to town myself."

The doctor was no more successful than Rilla had been, but his point of view cheered them all a little, and helped them through the evening.
240 "Is the British navy anchored in those three miles?" demanded Susan scornfully. "Is the British navy anchored in those three miles?" demanded Susan scornfully.

"It is the opinion of a man who knows all about it," said Cousin Sophia solemnly.

"There is no such person," retorted Susan. "As for the military critics, they do not know one blessed thing about it, any more than you or I. They have been mistaken times out of number. Why do you always look on the dark side, Sophia Crawford?"

"Because there ain't any bright side, Susan Baker."

"Oh, is there not? It is the twentieth of April, and Hindy is not in Paris yet, although he said he would be there by April first. Is that not a bright spot at least?"
241 Gertrude shivered with pain. Gertrude shivered with pain. She looked up at the pictures hanging over Rilla's desk and felt a sudden hatred of Mona Lisa's endless smile.

"Will not even this blot it off your face?" she thought savagely.
244 "That is when astronomers think the collision took place which produced this new star." "That is when astronomers think the collision took place which produced this new star. It makes me feel horribly insignificant," she added under her breath.
242 ...they all plucked up heart and courage to carry on, just because a faithful little dog at the Glen station was still watching with unbroken faith for his master to come home. ...they all plucked up heart and courage to carry on, just because a faithful little dog at the Glen station was still watching with unbroken faith for his master to come home. Common sense might scorn—incredulity might mutter "Mere superstition"—but in their hearts the folk of Ingleside stood by their belief that Dog Monday knew.

5 comments:

  1. I read all those books in jr high. I think I still have them somewhere at my parents house. I like the unabridged text better. Some of the dialog has more detail. Thanks for posting this.

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  2. I read this book, and all the others, in the sixties when I was just a girl and loved them. Which means I read the unabridged version, verily galloped through it in fact, and that leaves me wondering why it ever had to be abridged at all. Anyway, your post has brought back happy memories of my teenage reading so thanks for posting :) Elizabeth xx

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  3. I really need to read these books! The whole Anne series has been on my to-read list for years. I'll have to track down the unabridged Rilla, i like the added details.

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  4. Thank you for doing this! I had a secondhand copy and wondered how much was cut. The missing pages add so much detail to the story I'll have to get an unabridged and reread it.
    Rilla of Ingleside is one of my favorite books in the series, though it seems more like a standalone novel that happens to have the same people in it.

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  5. Again, thank you for doing this! I have been listening to an audiobook from Recorded Books, read by Barbara Caruso in 2014, which the introduction states is unabridged, and sharing a few quotes from copies of print versions. Last night while looking for a quote, I found an entire passage, censored, I assumed, for political correctness, and wrote a scathing email to Recorded Books demanding to know whether they or a publisher was responsible for this outrage and asking for a copy of all excised passages so I could read the whole book without delicate sensibilities dictating the contents! I then Googled, found this, learned the situation was far worse than mere political correctness, and alerted Recorded Books. You saved me a lot of fuming, work, and worry! Without this I might have had to find another edition and read the ENTIRE BOOK over! (I was beginning Chapter 21 when I found the copy had been butchered.)

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